China Copyright Conference – July 25, Fordham Law School

The Intellectual Property Law Institute at Fordham Law School, directed by Prof. Hugh Hansen, will host a conference on Chinese copyright law and policy, July 25, 2012. Topics will include:

  • Recent developments in substantive law
  • Sports broadcasting
  • Internet regulation
  • Judicial trends
  • Copyright, design, and conflicts with other trends

The Conference will be directed by Prof. Mark Cohen, and will take place in Room 302 of the Law School, 140 W. 62nd St., New York City. It will run from 10:30 to about 2:00, with lunch included. There will be no cost to attendees.  However, reservations are requested.

Continue reading

Other perspectives on Apple/Proview

Last week, we had a group of Chinese IP officials visiting Fordham – from Chinese Customs, a local Administration for Industry and Commerce and the Supreme People’s Procuratorate  – it was a perfect combination of officials to ask about the Apple / Proview case from the perspective of different Chinese government agencies, other than the courts. Continue reading

China Transitions: Where People Went in 2011, And Where They Are Headed

Looking back on 2011 and into 2012, it has been a year with considerable transition for individuals following IP issues in China.

There were some important lateral changes in the private sector.   With the Hogan Lovells merger, Doug Clark went to Hong Kong, and Horace Lam left Hogan Lovells for Jones Day in China.  Former Supreme People’s Court IPR Chief Judge, Jiang Zhipei, left the Fangda Partners for King and Wood.  Meanwhile, King and Wood, which already had a large China IP practice, merged with the Australian law firm, Mallesons, which has a Chinese IP practice.  Amongst the more recent retirees from the Chinese government, Xu Chao, of the National Copyright Administration, and Yin Xintian, of the State Intellectual Property Office, both left the government for the Wanhuida law firm.  An Qinghu, the former Director General in charge of the Chinese Trademark Office, also left his parent agency, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, to work for the Chinese Trademark Association. Continue reading