Three China/IP Positions Open

In what I hope is a good sign for the job market for next year, recently three China-related positions have opened up, all of which have IP as an area of focus.

In the private sector, the US Information Technology Office is looking for a new managing director. USITO is a trade group based in Beijing. USITO is involved in supporting US high tech industry in China.  USITO has been actively involved in IP issues in China in the past.

In Washington DC, the US Patent and Trademark Office (where I have my “day job”) is looking for a China IP program specialist. A law degree is not required. Instead the program requires experience and interest in running IP-related programs in China.   There are two announcements – one for applicants from outside the US government, and one for applicants from within the US government.  This position closes December 4, and is at the GS-12 – 13 level.  Applicants must be US citizens.
In addition the Department of Justice is looking for a state or federal prosecutor to go on detail to Hong Kong for a short term assignment (14 months). This position has a title of “Regional Intellectual Property Law Enforcement Coordinator” and includes obligations to: (1) assess the capacity of law enforcement authorities throughout the region to enforce intellectual property rights; (2) develop and deliver training and other capacity building formats designed to enhance the capacity of justice sector personnel to enforce intellectual property rights (3) assist in developing or strengthening institutions dedicated to enforcing intellectual property rights; (4) monitor regional trends in intellectual property protection and computer crimes; and (5) provide expert assistance in support of U.S. Government IP and computer crime policies and initiatives in the region. The deadline for applications is November 30.
Hopefully, these are signs of a developing job market in China IP-related matters in 2016!

The Proview and Apple Controversy – An Increasingly Tangled Web

The ongoing trademark dispute between Proview and Apple, which has now reached Apple’s home state of California, continues to draw attention around the world.  A court in Pudong, Shanghai refused to grant the injunction against sales of iPads, while Huizhou intermediate court has granted such an injunction. An appeal from the first judicial decision from the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s Court, which was adverse to Apple, to the Higher People’s Court of Guangzhou has just been heard, a ruling at this level is usually final in China. The Chinese central government has, thus far, properly abstained from declaring a position in this dispute and it is too early to tell whether Supreme People’s Court will hear a further appeal.

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