Fact and Fiction in the US-China IP Trade War

The Asia Society of Northern California is sponsoring a free webinar October 8 from 5-6:30 PM PST on “Fact and Fiction in the US-China IP Trade War” as part of its “Seek Truth from Facts” series on US-China relations.  The registration link is here.

I will be joined by some great thought leaders, including: Sharon Barner, General Counsel of Cummins and former Deputy Director of the USPTO; former Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit; Jim Mendenhall, former Deputy US Trade Representative; and He Jing. a partner of the GEN law firm.

Past events on IP have brought a diverse and spirited audience reflecting West Coast perspectives. These programs also got many “hits” on the subsequent recordings. Please join us live and raise your questions as we discuss such tough issues as: whether foreigners win in the Chinese courts, was the Phase 1 Agreement on IP a “good deal”,  and how the US and China can make things better. 

The time zone is perfect for friends in East Asia to join. I am looking forward to your participation!

China Transitions: Where People Went in 2011, And Where They Are Headed

Looking back on 2011 and into 2012, it has been a year with considerable transition for individuals following IP issues in China.

There were some important lateral changes in the private sector.   With the Hogan Lovells merger, Doug Clark went to Hong Kong, and Horace Lam left Hogan Lovells for Jones Day in China.  Former Supreme People’s Court IPR Chief Judge, Jiang Zhipei, left the Fangda Partners for King and Wood.  Meanwhile, King and Wood, which already had a large China IP practice, merged with the Australian law firm, Mallesons, which has a Chinese IP practice.  Amongst the more recent retirees from the Chinese government, Xu Chao, of the National Copyright Administration, and Yin Xintian, of the State Intellectual Property Office, both left the government for the Wanhuida law firm.  An Qinghu, the former Director General in charge of the Chinese Trademark Office, also left his parent agency, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, to work for the Chinese Trademark Association. Continue reading