Several China IP and Trade Opportunities Open in the DC Area

USPTO just announced on May 6 a position opening as a “Program Specialist” handling Intellectual Property Exchanges with China.  There are two position descriptions.

The positions involve developing and implementing multiple year  training plans (MOUs) with Chinese counterpart agencies; organizing programs for Chinese visitors to the USPTO; working on USPTO materials to be published; developing online resources; developing an on-line presence;  developing training materials; providing empirical sources/information resources for companies and other government agencies; and  working with universities and third parties in developing richer information sources.  The position involves working with the China team s at USPTO’s Office of Policy and International Affairs.

USTR’s IP office also has a “Director” level position open.  The position is not China-specific, but does involve “resolv[ing] IPR and innovation trade problems using all available tools of U.S. trade policy, including the Special 301 process” and “serv[ing] as negotiator for the intellectual property provisions of trade agreements”.  In addition, USTR’s China office has a trade position open that does not  appear to be IP-focused.  If your interest is in China trade and IP, my guess is that both jobs would help job-seekers get a foot in the door of doing China-related trade and IP/innovation policy.

Most federal jobs have short closing dates.  Please read the announcements for the full descriptions and details.

Not to be outdone, the private sector is also looking.  Asia Society also has a new policy position opening involving Asia-wide economies and trade.

In addition, Chinese graduate students in the United States have only a few days left (May 11) to apply for scholarships to the US Foreign Policy Colloquium of the National Committee on US-China Relations.

Policy Trade Analyst at the China Affairs Office of the USTR

From the USAJOBS site:

“The incumbent serves as a Policy Analyst (Trade) in the Office of China Affairs, at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.  The incumbent formulates and develops U.S. policy positions on international trade and investment issues, as they relate to China.  The incumbent also initiates the development of trade policy regarding China for consideration by higher level policy makers in the interagency trade policy making process.  The incumbent participates in the planning and formulation of negotiating positions and tactics to be taken by the U.S. government on a variety of trade issues during negotiations.  The incumbent prepares Congressional testimony, briefing materials, summary statements and speeches for the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), both Deputy USTRs, the Assistant USTRs and other senior executives, as appropriate, on major trade issues.  The incumbent promptly analyzes information to explain and defend the Administration’s trade policies to foreign governments, the public, the press, and the Congress.  Extensive experience in leading negotiations on trade or international economic matters with China is required.  Proficiency in speaking/reading the Mandarin language is strongly desired.  The position requires domestic and foreign travel.”


For more information and application, please visit USAJOBS.

USPTO and SAIC Engagement on IP Issues

From Director’s Forum: David Kappos’ Public Blog:

On Sept 10, 2012 the USPTO was privileged to host Minister Zhou Bohua and his senior delegation from the State Administrative for Industry and Commerce of China (SAIC) of the People’s Republic of China. Minister Zhou, visited us for about four hours, as part of a stopover en route to a meeting in Brazil. This was likely the first time that a Minister from SAIC has visited USPTO. Continue reading

Au Revoir (Zaijian) – Nam Ngô Thiên and Welcome (Huanying) – Jared Ragland

I sat down with Nam Ngô Thiên (Chinese name: 吴天南, Wu Tiennan) (picture above) on Sept 15 in Beijing, fortunate to catch him on a recent visit back to Beijing since his August 1 relocation to Singapore. Nam represented both the French Patent Office and the European Patent Office in Beijing since 1999. He was with the European Patent Office working on IPR-1, the first-round European IPR technical assistance program in Beijing from 1999-2003, when I first met him. At that time he was ably assisted by Ms. Teri Dunphy and by Yang Guohua, from the Ministry of Commerce, amongst others.   He  came back to China in 2004 with the French Industrial Property Office (INPI), staying until 2012. Nam is a dear colleague and friend and will be difficult to replace.
There is also one recent diplomatic arrival in China: Jared Ragland, from USPTO, who is posted to a new office in Shanghai. Jared came over from USTR to USPTO.  He also has a solid scientific background that will likely be valuable to the R&D community in Shanghai. The contact information for Jared can be found here.
I wish Nam and Jared the best in their new postings!

Obama’s New Laboratories for IP Enforcement Involving China

The President mentioned China four times in his State of the Union address on January 24, 2012.   Although it’s a bit unclear what his game plan is, it seems that he is looking closely at IP-related claims.  “It’s not right when another country lets our movies, music, and software be pirated,” Obama said:  “Tonight, I’m announcing the creation of a Trade Enforcement Unit that will be charged with investigating unfair trade practices in countries like China. “

What will be the nature of this Trade Enforcement Unit? During the Bush administration, a “top to bottom” review at the U.S. Trade Representative’s office resulted in the creation of a China trade enforcement unit within USTR that took the lead on China trade cases at the WTO.  Claire Reade, the current Assistant USTR for China was the head of that unit.  Continue reading

China Transitions: Where People Went in 2011, And Where They Are Headed

Looking back on 2011 and into 2012, it has been a year with considerable transition for individuals following IP issues in China.

There were some important lateral changes in the private sector.   With the Hogan Lovells merger, Doug Clark went to Hong Kong, and Horace Lam left Hogan Lovells for Jones Day in China.  Former Supreme People’s Court IPR Chief Judge, Jiang Zhipei, left the Fangda Partners for King and Wood.  Meanwhile, King and Wood, which already had a large China IP practice, merged with the Australian law firm, Mallesons, which has a Chinese IP practice.  Amongst the more recent retirees from the Chinese government, Xu Chao, of the National Copyright Administration, and Yin Xintian, of the State Intellectual Property Office, both left the government for the Wanhuida law firm.  An Qinghu, the former Director General in charge of the Chinese Trademark Office, also left his parent agency, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, to work for the Chinese Trademark Association. Continue reading