December 2017 Update

 

Here are some updates on IP developments in China from this past December 2017:

1.  Xi Jinping: China must accelerate implementation of big data strategy (English) 习近平:实施国家大数据战略加快建设数字中国 (Chinese).  Xi Jinping, during a collective study session of the Politburo on December 8th, has urged the country to accelerate implementation of its big data strategy to better serve social and economic development and improve people’s lives. Xi said efforts should be made to advance national big data strategy, improve digital infrastructure, promote integration and sharing of digital resources, and safeguard data security.

2.  Legal Daily on December 5, 2017 notes that leakage of private data from government  websites is getting attention, all local governments start rectification and protection mechanism  政府网站泄露隐私问题受关注,各地整改升级保护机制 (Chinese)

3.  Ministry of Education, Department of Human Resources and Social Security, and Ministry of Finance regulated information disclosure of private information 教育部人社部财政部三部委规范信息公开 保隐私信息安全自查工作要不留死角(Chinese).  This appears to be related to the developments described in the Legal Daily article described above.  Note that unauthorized disclosure of confidential information of foreigners had been a concern during prior meetings of the bilateral Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade.   Compare 2014 and 2016 U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT).   From 2014 JCTT: The United States and China confirm that trade secrets submitted to the government in administrative or regulatory proceedings are to be protected from improper disclosure to the public and only disclosed to government officials in connection with their official duties in accordance with law.  Each side will further study how to optimize its respective relevant administrative and regulatory procedures within its legal system, where appropriate, including by strengthening confidentiality protection measures, limiting the scope of government personnel having access to trade secrets, limiting the information required from companies to include only information reasonably necessary for satisfying regulatory purposes, and stipulating that any requirements on government agencies to publicly disclose information appropriately allow for the withholding of trade secrets.  Government officials who illegally disclose companies’ trade secrets are to be subject to administrative or legal liability according to law.  The United States and China agree to exchange information on the scope of protection of trade secrets and confidential business information under their respective legal systems.  China acknowledges that it is to conduct a legislative study of a revised law on trade secrets.  The United States acknowledges that draft legislation proposing a Federal civil cause of action for trade secrets misappropriation has been introduced in the U.S. Congress.  From 2016 JCCT: Both sides confirm that, in those cases in which a judicial or administrative enforcement authority requests the submission of confidential information in conjunction with a trade secret enforcement matter, such requests will be narrowly tailored to avoid putting at risk sensitive business information and will be subject to appropriate protective orders to control additional disclosure and ensure that information is not further misappropriated and that any decision that is made publicly available in conjunction with a trade secret enforcement matter will have all confidential information appropriately redacted. The United States and China confirm that trade secret investigations are conducted in a prudent and cautious manner.

4.  Overview of China’s intellectual property protection: 32000 suspected criminal cases have been transferred since 2011.  中国知识产权保护状况全景式展示  2011年以来移送涉嫌犯罪案件3.2万起(Chinese).  Note: This is data on referrals from administrative to criminal enforcement. The transfer from admin to criminal seems like part of overall efforts that China took to improve IP protection. The article mentioned that three agencies: National Copyright Administration, SAIC and SIPO, all enhanced IP protection enforcement. For instance, National Copyright Administration, through “Jian Wang” (Swordnet) project, investigated 5560 infringement cases over the past 13 years; SAIC investigated 19,400 trademark infringement cases from Jan to Oct 2017; and SIPO and other IP protection agencies investigated 189,000 all kinds of infringement and counterfeiting cases in 2016.Related background information: State Council Opinion on Improving Administrative/Criminal IPR Enforcement Coordination.

5.  China Intellectual Property Development Alliance was established  中国知识产权发展联盟成立 (Chinese).   The focus of this alliance is to create a good environment for IP application and protection and to build an ecosystem for IP operation.

6.  Notice on establishing national intellectual property pilot parks.  关于确定国家知识产权试点园区的通知 (Chinese).  2017 new list of national intellectual property pilot parks 2017年新一批国家知识产权试点园区名单 (Chinese).  These pilot parks are established by local governments.  They will provide IP services, information sharing services, help incubate IP intensive industries, and provide supporting infrastructure. SIPO approves them, and will monitor pilot parks’ work progress and review document for renewal.

7.  The story behind of independent development of C919 (English); C919背后的自主研制之路 (Chinese).  The Chinese article describes the patents involved in the C919 aircraft project.

8.  China implemented the first national military standards of intellectual property management in the field of equipment construction 我国首部装备建设领域知识产权管理国家军用标准实施 (Chinese).

9.  China’s R&D investment hits a new high.  我国研发投入再创新高 (Chinese).   China’s total GDP in 2016 was $11 trillion and R&D investment is around $230 billion, which is about 2.15% of GDP. For US, R&D investment is estimated to be around 2.8% of GDP in 2016.

10. China’s invention patent applications exceed one million from Jan. to Oct. (English); 前10个月发明专利申请量超百万件 (Chinese).

11.WIPO Stats on Patent Application Filings Shows China Continuing to Lead the World (English);  China Tops Patent, Trademark, Design Filings in 2016 (English).

12,  “China Big Data Rule of Law Development Report 2017” released.   《中国大数据法治发展报告(2017)》发布 (Chinese).  Related:  Presentation on 2017 China Big Data Rule of Law Development Report 2017中国大数据法治发展报告(实录与PPT)(Chinese)

13.  China to boost competitiveness in AI (English) 产业三年行动计划提出在八大领域率先取得突破——人工智能服务渐入千家万户(Chinese).  The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) recently released an action plan to substantially improve the development of the AI industry. This plan set to make breakthroughs in eight areas, including smart cars, service robot, drone, AI medical diagnosis, facial recognition, voice recognition, smart translation and smart home product. The MIIT promised more policy support, including special funds, talent cultivation and a better business environment. Measures will also be rolled out to build industry clusters, set up key laboratories and encourage data sharing.

14.  Encourage indigenous innovation and build strong brands.  鼓励自主创新 聚力品牌经济 (Chinese).  The China Council for Brand Development is working with the National Development and Reform Commission to formulate “China’s Brand Development Strategy.” This program aims to cultivate 1000 well-known international brands in five years.

15.  More than 2000 clues have been received for the “Suyuan” campaign against trademark infringement.  打击商标侵权“溯源”行动已收到2000余条案件线索 (Chinese)  SAIC started a campaign called “Suyuan” against trademark infringement in September 2017. Until the end of November, more than 2000 clues on cases have been reported.

16.  Shenzhen IP court and Shenzhen Finance court were established 深圳知识产权法庭和深圳金融法庭同时揭牌办公 (Chinese).   A new Shenzhen IP court was opened on December 26, 2017. This court will handle intellectual property cases which were under the jurisdiction of the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s Court.

17,. Wang Jinshan was appointed as the Chief Judge of Beijing IP Court.  王金山被任命为为北京知识产权法院院长 (Chinese).  Wang replaces Chief Judge Su Chi, who has guided the court since it was first launched and implemented numerous reform projects. We wish him well. Judge Wang graduated from Peking University with a major in Law. He was the party secretary of Beijing IP Court since May 2017. Judge Wang also previously worked at Beijing Intermediate People’s Court.

18.  China’s software copyright registration exceeds 700,000 in 2017.  2017年我国软件著作权登记量突破70万件  http://www.nipso.cn/onews.asp?id=39313 (Chinese).

We hope to be providing more updates in the year ahead from the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology.

As usual the information contained herein does not necessarily represent the opinion of any government agency, company, individual or the University of California.

By Berkeley staff.

US & China Conclude High Level Exchange on Judicial Reform and Commercial Rule of Law

WP_20160802_005 (1)(photo by Mark Cohen)

Last week, top U.S. and Chinese judges and legal experts came together to implement the agreement between Presidents Obama and Xi to hold a high level exchange on judicial reform and commercial rule of law, which stated:

China and the United States commit to conduct high-level and expert discussions commencing in early 2016 to provide a forum to support and exchange views on judicial reform and identify and evaluate the challenges and strategies in implementing the rule of law. U.S. participants are to include leading members of the U.S. judiciary, U.S. government legal policy experts, and officials from the Departments of Commerce and Justice and the Office of the United States Trade Representative. Chinese participants are to include officials from the Central Leading Group on Judicial Reform, leading members of the Chinese judiciary, and Chinese government legal policy experts. This dialogue is to result in an improvement in the transparency and predictability of the business environment. This dialogue does not replace, duplicate or weaken existing regular bilateral legal and human rights dialogues between China and the United States.

According to Amb. Baucus’ view of the dialogue: “companies – American and Chinese – need predictability.  An independent judiciary that can resolve civil and administrative disputes fairly, transparently, and according to the law, is critical.  If we can deepen cooperation between the United States and China on judicial matters, it will help improve the investment climate, to the benefit of companies and workers in both of our countries.”

Chinese media reported that there were over 30 experts, officials and judges attending the program, which included several important IP judges such as SPC Justice Tao Kaiyuan,  and Deputy Chief   IP Judge Wang Chuang, as well as Beijing IP Court President Su Chi, as well as He Zhonglin, head of the SPC’s Office of International Cooperation and a former IP judge himself (see picture above).  According to the media, members of the delegation also met with Meng Jianzhu, head of the Party Political Legal Committee.

The US Department of Justice released the opening speech of Bill Baer, Assistant Attorney General, who noted that the Dialogue included many topics germane to IP such as: “How can parties obtain the evidence they need to prepare for trial?  What evidence should be admissible in court?  How do courts and parties use expert witnesses?  What can courts do to handle a large number of cases fairly, transparently, and efficiently, when resources are finite?  What sort of personnel do we need to implement the rule of law, and how do we ensure that they are properly trained and feel they are part of a justice-focused mission? Finally, what is the role of precedents in providing guidance to business as to what behavior violates the law?”

This is not the first such judicial exchange, nor the first exchange with a common law country.   The Federal Circuit has been engaged in two major programs on IP adjudication with the Chinese courts, including one that involved over 1200 people including 200 Chinese judges  in 2012, and a second large sale  program in Shanghai in 2015This year, the focus on the UK judicial exchanges this year is also on commercial law.  Individual US judges, such as Denny Chin and Randall Rader have also traveled to China and engaged the Chinese judiciary on IP and commercial legal matters, including by attending important programs in the United States.  In the UK, Mr Justice Birss was very supportive of these exchanges in comments he delivered at the Fordham IP Conference this year. The  SPC has reportedly established friendly relationships with judicial institutions of more than 130 countries and 20 international or regional organizations.

Chinese media noted that the next meeting of the dialogue of scheduled for Washington, DC.

 

 

Justice Tao Kaiyuan and the Role of the Judiciary

MadameTaoMichelleLee

Justice Tao Kaiyuan of the Supreme People’s Court, who had been to the United States in 2015 delivering important speeches on rule of law, has recently published an article on “Giving Full Play to the Leading Role of Judicial Protection of IP Rights“ 充分发挥司法保护知识产权的主导作用”(Dec. 31, 2015).  The article is receiving considerable attention in China, as it was published by Qiu Shi, 求是(“Seeking Truth”), a bimonthly political theory published by the Central Party School and the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China.  The publication of the article appears to be timed with the release of the recent draft of the Patent Law Amendments, comments for which were due the day after publication (January 1).  The proposed patent amendments would strengthen the role of administrative agencies in IP enforcement, to the possible detriment of the judiciary.

The author of the article is no less important than its contents.  Madame Tao knows patents.  She was the former Director General of the Guangdong Patent Office and therefor once had “vertical” reporting responsibility to SIPO (see picture above taken by me of Madame Tao [on the right] with USPTO Director Michelle Lee taken in 2015).  Although the article was authored in her name, many in China were speculating that the article was approved by higher authorities – perhaps Zhou Qiang, the President of the Supreme People’s Court, with Madame Tao serving as an appropriate messenger.

The concerns about this draft on patent law enforcement are not that different from those in the earlier (2012) draft when I blogged in “Why the Proposed Amendments to the Patent Law Really Matter … and Maybe Not Just For Patents” that “the changes strike me as a rather sudden about face in China’s march towards better civil protection of IP.” Madame Tao takes this several steps further.

Madame Tao’s article is divided into three parts: (1) The important meaning of giving full play to the leading role of the judicial protection of IP rights; (2) The key factors that constrain the leading use role of judicial protection of IP; and (3) Key measures in giving full play to the leading role of judicial protection of IP rights.   Here are some of the points she makes:

Madame Tao refers back to the National IP Strategy and related documents, such as the Third Plenum, the NPC’s decision to establish IP courts, and the Action Plan for the National IP Strategy to underscore the well-established, leading role of the courts in enforcing IP.

Her article compares certain key elements of judicial protection versus administrative protection.  In her view, judicial enforcement can curtail abuses of administrative enforcement.  It also has other advantages.  It has clear rules.  It is transparent.  It can help establish guidance for businesses by establishing clear standards for similar disputes (a possible nod to efforts at developing case law/guiding cases).  Moreover, civil enforcement comports with notions of private ownership and the development of markets and creation of a fair competitive environment in China.  Madame Tao especially underscores the role of the courts in supervising administrative agencies.  As I have noted, this is also an important part of the foreign IP docket in China.  Madame Tao states that the judiciary should also actively guide administrative law enforcement in investigation and review of evidence, and determination of infringements.

Madame Tao also calls for greater coordination in administrative and judicial roles in IP protection, noting that administrative enforcement played an important leading role in the beginning of China’s IP enforcement environment.  Administrative enforcement has “in a short time met the need for building effective IP protection.”  However, the “growing maturity” of the judicial system has caused increasing problems in the coordination process.

Madame Tao also calls for specific policy initiatives, many of which are already underway.  She calls for greater deterrent civil damages, including by revising patent, copyright and unfair competition laws based on experience of the trademark law revisions.   She also suggests that a discovery system should be considered.  Civil and criminal divisions in IP should be unified.  She suggests that a specialized national IP court should be researched and promoted, and she calls for the unification of technical appellate cases, perhaps like the CAFC.  She also notes that the division between infringement and validity determinations in the courts in patents and trademarks should be addressed, and calls for improvements in the availability of provisional measures.

She calls for greater improvements in judicial protective measures, including in obtaining evidence and the convenience and effectiveness of remedies.  Among other specific judicial reforms, she also suggests exploring intellectual property case law, improving judicial accountability and developing judicial professionalism.  Finally, Madame Tao also calls for expanding international awareness by IP judges to better protect national interests and to increase China’s IP influence.

Altogether, a tour de force.

Here’s what her speech looks like in a machine-translated wordcloud:taowordcloud

 

 

 

A Pair of Experiments in the Beijing IP Court

依波路(远东)有限公司

Back in 2012, I noted that “[t]he Chinese civil judiciary is pursuing reform and gaining experience, as Deng Xiaoping noted, by crossing the river by feeling the stones. A disproportionate part of that judicial experience is also being gained from the relatively small numbers of IP cases in the Chinese courts.” One notable and welcome source of those reforms is the new Beijing IP court, which is also serving as a base for experimenting in the development of a system of case law with Chinese characteristics.  I believe that the most notable development in Chinese IP in 2015 has been the role the courts are playing in judicial reform generally.  I have been privileged to hear Chief Judge Su Chi and his team from this court speak several times since his court was established, and have never failed to be impressed by their depth of knowledge and passion for judging.

There have been two notable year-end developments by the Beijing IP court.  One case involved the use of en banc decisions to invalidate a trademark normative document.  In this case the IP Court made an en banc decision to implement Article 21 of the SPC’s Interpretation on Practical Questions regarding the Administrative Litigation law of the PRC中华人民共和国行政诉讼法〉若干问题的解释 (April 28, 2015) (the JI). Article 21 of the JI provides that “When normative documents are not in accordance with law, the People’s Court shall not use it as proof that the administrative action has a legal basis, and shall explain this in the reasoning of its decision.  The People’s Court’s decision shall make recommendations on disposition of the normative document to the enacting agency, which can be copied to the government organs at the same level of the enacting agency, or to one government level higher.” (规范性文件不合法的,人民法院不作为认定行政行为合法的依据,并在裁判理由中予以阐明。作出生效裁判的人民法院应当向规范性文件的制定机关提出处理建议,并可以抄送制定机关的同级人民政府或者上一级行政机关。)

The other case, no less dramatic, involves what may be the publication of a dissenting period. Both of these developments occurred this month (December 2015).

The case arising under Article 21 of the SPC Interpretation involved an interpretation of the State Administration of Industry and Commerce regarding what constitutes a “day” for purposes of implementing a change in trademark classifications.  The IP Court found that the notice’s definition of a “day from a 24 hour period to a month exceeded the scope of power to explain the law, ruling in favor of plaintiff who claimed to have filed its trademark in advance of two other parties who filed one week and three weeks after plaintiffs filing.

When this case was heard in September, Chinese media talked about this as the first effort to “break the ice” by a Chinese court to invalidate administrative “红头文件” – red letterhead documents, i.e., normative documents of the type referenced in the JI.    The court reportedly also experimented in using live testimony and cross-examination in an atypical debate-style process. The pleadings were also entered into as part of the opinion after the party’s signatures confirmation. The decision does not yet appear to be on line, but a summary is attached  here (in Chinese).

Another procedurally significant decision involved the appearance of dissenting opinions in IP cases. Here again, the Beijing IP court is a trail and trial blazer in this recent experiment. The case involved Ernest Borel (Far East) Co. Ltd. and China’s Trademark Review and Adjudication Board. There were different opinions by the court on proof of copyright in the logo of Ernest Borel, including use of the original trademark registration and a subsequent copyright registration to prove that the design belonged to Ernest Borel. The minority opinion supported using these two registrations as a proof of copyright ownership.  Ernest Borel was attempting to prove that it owned the copyright in a logo that was being used by a Shenzhen company in its trademark registration (深圳市依波路保健科技有限公司).

Two notable experiments by an experimental court!

Note that the logo at the top of this article is a logo of Ernest Borel that I found online if for illustrative purposes only.  It does not imply any endorsement of the positions here by Ernest Borel.  It may not also be the trademark that is the subject of the pending case.  Any trademarks and copyrights are the property of their respective owners.