IPR Outcomes in the 26th JCCT

Here are the IP outcomes of the 26th Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade, concluded early in November 2015 in Guangzhou.  The IP-related outcomes appear primarily in three different places in the JCCT outcome document, under “Competition”, “Intellectual Property Rights” and “Cooperative Dialogues and Exchanges.”

I have repeated below the outcome language in full, without the annotation that appears in the US Department of Commerce release on the subject, followed by my own “references” on the outcome to compare the text with recent developments in these areas.

The Chinese government version of the outcomes follows the US outcomes.

COMPETITION

China’s anti-monopoly enforcement agencies are to conduct enforcement according to the Anti-monopoly Law and are to be free from intervention by other agencies.

China clarifies that commercial secrets obtained in the process of Anti-monopoly Law enforcement are protected as required under the Anti-monopoly Law and shall not be disclosed to other agencies or third parties, except with a waiver of confidentiality by the submitting party or under circumstances as defined by law.

Taking into account the pro-competitive effects of intellectual property, China attaches great importance to maintaining coherence in the rules related to IPR in the context of the Anti-monopoly Law. China clarifies that any State Council Anti-monopoly Law Commission guidelines will apply to the three anti-monopoly law enforcement agencies.

The Chinese side clarifies that in the process of formulating guidance related to intellectual property rights in the context of anti-monopoly law, it will solicit comments from relevant parties, including the public, in accordance with law and policy.

References: SAIC’s IP Abuse rules, NDRC’s draft IP Abuse rules. Importantly, this outcome specifically recognizes the pro-competitive nature of promoting IP. As I said in my comments on the NDRC’s IP abuse guideline questionnaire, “Rather than seek to minimize IP rights through euphemisms such as “balance” perhaps a better approach would be how to optimize the patent system to foster long term innovation and competition and insure that the competition system supports and does not retard such development.”

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

Standards and Intellectual Property

The United States and China affirm the beneficial role of standards in promoting innovation, efficiency, and public health and safety, and the need to strike an appropriate balance of interests of multiple stakeholders.

The United States and China commit that licensing commitments for patents in voluntary standards are made voluntarily and without government involvement in negotiations over such commitments, except as otherwise provided by legally binding measures.

The United States confirms that Chinese firms participate in the setting of voluntary consensus standards in the United States on a non-discriminatory basis, consistent with the rules and procedures of the relevant standards organizations. China welcomes U.S.-invested firms in China to participate in the development of national recommendatory and social organization standards in China on a non-discriminatory basis.

With a view to enhance mutual understanding and trust, the United States and China agree to hold dialogues over issues under this topic.

Here are some other blogs on this important topic.

Trade Secrets

The United States and China are committed to providing a strong trade secrets protection regime that promotes innovation and encourages fair competition.  China clarifies it is in the process of amending the Anti-Unfair Competition Law; intends to issue model or guiding court cases; and intends to clarify rules on preliminary injunctions, evidence preservation orders and damages. The United States confirms that draft legislation proposed to establish a federal civil cause of action for trade secrets misappropriation has been introduced in relevant committees. Both sides confirm that IP-related investigations, including on trade secrets, are conducted in a prudent and cautious manner.  The United States and China agree to jointly share experiences and practices in the areas of protecting trade secrets from disclosure during investigations and in court proceedings, and identify practices that companies may undertake to protect trade secrets from misappropriation in accordance with respective laws.

References: Note that the reference in the trade secret provision to a degree mirrors that of the Competition outcome, regarding protecting confidential information in administrative proceedings. Proposed revisions to the AUCL were previously discussed here.

Geographical Indications (GIs)

The United States and China will continue our dialogue on GIs. Both sides reaffirmed the importance of the 2014 JCCT commitment on GIs and confirmed that this commitment applies to all GIs, including those protected pursuant to international agreements. China will publish in draft form for public comment, and expects to do so by the end of 2016, procedures that provide the opportunity for a third party to cancel already-granted GIs.

Reference: This commitment builds on the 2014 GI commitment in the JCCT. An important case involving enforcement of a trademark based GI for scotch whisky is discussed here.

Sports Broadcasts

The United States and China agree to protect original recordings of the images, or sound and images, of live events, including sports broadcasts, against acts of unauthorized exploitation, including the unauthorized retransmission of such broadcasts over computer networks, in accordance with their respective laws and regulations.  The United States and China agree to discuss copyright protection for sports broadcasts and further cooperate on this issue in the JCCT IPR Working Group and other appropriate bilateral fora.

References: Copyright protection for sports broadcasting has been discussed elsewhere in this blog, and is of increasing important to China as it prepares to host the Winter Olympics and wants to develop its sports leagues. In addition US courts have granted copyright protection to Chinese sports broadcasts in a recent case. Tencent has also signed an important licensing deal with the NBA to make content available online.

Enhanced Enforcement Against Media Boxes and Unauthorized Content Providers

Noting the challenges posed by new technologies to the protection of copyright, China and the United States will continue discussions and share respective experiences and practices on combating the unauthorized online distribution of audiovisual content made possible by media boxes.  China clarifies it is to enhance enforcement against such media boxes and the providers of unauthorized content in accordance with its laws and regulations.

Reference: A recent US media box case involving Chinese content is discussed here.

Online Enforcement

In order to address the civil, administrative and criminal enforcement challenges caused by the rapid development of e-commerce, as part of the JCCT IPR Working Group, China and the United States will enhance engagement and exchanges between U.S. and Chinese government IPR policy and enforcement officials, IP right holders, business representatives and online sales-platform operators, among other relevant stakeholders.  This engagement will cover current and anticipated challenges in protecting and enforcing IPR online by sharing respective practices, discussing possible improvements in each country’s systems, facilitating information exchange and training between our two countries, and increasing cooperation on cross-border enforcement.  The goal of this effort is to enhance existing legal and cooperative regimes among businesses, rights holders and governments in civil, administrative and criminal online IPR enforcement.  Appropriate criminal matters will be referred, if necessary, to law enforcement agencies through the Joint Liaison Group (JLG) IP Criminal Enforcement Working Group or domestic law enforcement officials.

References: there have been numerous Chinese domestic efforts to deal with on-line infringement, including copyright-related campaigns, and an important role for Chinese Customs.

COOPERATIVE DIALOGUES AND EXCHANGES

Searchable Database for Intellectual Property (IP) Cases

The United States welcomes that the Supreme People’s Court has established a database for searching intellectual property-related court decisions.  In order to increase the understanding of each other’s legal systems, the United States and China agree to dialogue and to share experiences on their respective databases containing IP cases.

References: Whether or not China is developing “case law with Chinese characteristics,” understanding how Chinese courts handle cases can help guide sound business decisions.

Bad Faith Trademark Filings

Given the importance of addressing bad faith trademark filings, both sides agree to continue to prioritize the issue of bad faith trademark filings, and to strengthen communication and exchange on this issue through existing channels.

References: This is a continuation of earlier efforts.

Copyright Legislation

The United States and China are to continue exchanges on the development of their respective copyright laws.  China clarifies that its Copyright Law is in the process of amendment and useful principles and interpretative guidance from the Supreme People Court’s 2012 Judicial Interpretation on Internet Intermediary Liability will be considered in the law, if appropriate and feasible.

The final judicial interpretation is available here. Here is a blog on the 2014 State Council draft of the Copyright Law revision, and a blog on a 2012 NCA draft.

Exchange on Intellectual Property Rights Legislation

Recognizing the success and experience of recent exchanges on IP legislation through the JCCT IPR Working Group, programs under the Cooperation Framework Agreement and other fora, as well as the desire of the United States and China to further understand recent developments in this area, the United States and China agree to exchange views on their legislative developments in IP and innovation including on pending reforms in copyright law, patent law, trade secret law (anti-unfair competition law), science and technology achievement law, etc., with relevant legislative bodies.

References: This is a broad commitment, with much legislative activity planned in China in areas such as trade secrets, copyright, patents and related regulations.

Protection of New Plant Varieties

The United States and China agree to hold exchanges on the protection of new plant varieties through bilateral meetings and other means to be determined.

References: China and Switzerland agreed to extend plant variety protections in the Swiss-China FTA.

Here are the outcomes involving IP from the MofCOM website.  Source:

http://www.mofcom.gov.cn/article/i/jyjl/l/201512/20151201200026.shtm

“特别301”报告 SPECIAL 301 REPORT

美方重申其承诺,将在“特别301报告”中客观、公正、善意地评价包括中国在内的外国政府,在知识产权保护和执法方面付出的努力。美方欢迎旨在加强中国知识产权保护的改革和行动,并承诺在2016年“特别301报告”中将强调中国政府在知识产权保护和执法方面采取的积极行动。

 恶名市场 NOTORIOUS MARKETS

美方重申其承诺,如果适当,将在“恶名市场”名单中客观、公正、善意地评估和认可外国实体,包括中国实体,在知识产权保护和执法方面付出的努力和取得的成绩。美方计划在2016年通过将利益相关方的异议期延长一倍,继续增加程序的透明度。美方将继续与中方就此事项进行讨论。

 

知识产权有效和平衡保护 EFFECTIVE AND BALANCED IP PROTECTION

考虑到《与贸易有关的知识产权协定》的原则和目标,美方和中方将继续就诸如有助于保护创新者免于恶意诉讼的相关政策进行交流和沟通,为创新行为提供积极环境。

 

知识产权合作 IP COOPERATION

中美双方确认知识产权保护在中美双边经贸关系中的关键作用。双方承认合作的益处,并认可合作构成了双方知识产权交流的基础,承诺进一步加强重要领域的深入合作,包括:

进一步加强中美商贸联委会知识产权工作组作为牵头协调知识产权问题双边论坛的作用。

继续高度重视中美知识产权合作框架协议的工作,包括2016年司法交流和将在中国举办的一项培训项目;在完成并对现有承诺项目进行审查后,在预算允许的前提下,考虑在框架协议下增加其他项目。

支持中国商务部在2016年第一季度举办的技术许可联合研讨会。

其他项目将根据个案原则进行组织。双方认识到中美双方,特别是美方,与一系列从事知识产权培训和技术交流的机构和私人组织合作,实施了广泛的项目策划工作。

 

加强在打击网络盗版方面的合作  STRENGTHENED COOPERATION IN DEALING WITH ONLINE PIRACY

为应对在美国涉嫌网络盗版刑事侵权案件影响中国权利人的情况,中美执法联合联络小组下设的知识产权刑事执法合作工作组在美国驻华使馆的联系人将负责接收中方行政部门转交的此类信息。

 

通过中美双边合作加强知识产权在企业中的利用和保护 USING BILATERAL COOPERATION TO STRENGTHEN IP UTILIZATION AND PROTECTION IN ENTERPRISES

认识到双边贸易与投资持续增长的情况,中美双方同意加强合作与交流,就各自国家知识产权保护和利用有关的经验数据进行研究,并在此领域采取具体行动或举办项目,以协助中美关于鼓励创新的决策,并帮助中美创新者、创造者和企业家更好地理解如何在各自国家创造、保护和利用知识产权。

 

深化和加强中美知识产权刑事执法合作 DEEPENING CRIMINAL ENFORCEMENT COOPERATION IN IP

在中美执法联合联络小组下设的知识产权刑事执法合作工作组机制项下,中美将继续就跨国知识产权调查开展合作。双方将确定共同合作的重点案件,就此类案件保持定期沟通和信息分享,并探索在共同感兴趣的领域开展技术交流的机会。

 …

中美共同打击网络销售假药 JOINT SINO-US COMBATTING OF ONLINE COUNTERFEIT MEDICINE SALES

中美两国政府都非常重视打击网络销售假药以保障公共的用药安全和健康。两国食品药品监管机构之间已就打击网络销售假药开展合作,并承诺未来继续开展合作。这种合作包括分享信息、分享提高公众对网络销售药品认知的最佳实践以及加强在现有国际组织活动中的沟通与协调。

Updated: December 2 and 3,  2015, December 26, 2018.

Vice President Biden and Pharmaceutical Innovation

Innovative pharmaceutical companies have been facing a number of challenges in obtaining or maintaining patents in China. One of these issues has involved progressively more restrictive interpretations of Art. 26.3 of the Patent Law (enablement or sufficiency of data disclosure). This issue has been previously highlighted here (https://chinaipr.com/tag/enablement-requirement/). In addition to these challenges, pharmaceutical companies had been unable to supplement data, the Patent Examination Guidelines have been applied in a retroactive manner to impose new and unanticipated burdens on applicants who were previously granted patents, and the actual standard of sufficiency of data disclosure appears to have been raised in successive editions of the Examination Guidelines. Here are comparison charts that I prepared on some of the progressively higher burdens being imposed in the Examination Guidelines.

Now we have a statement in the Joint Fact Sheet from the Vice President on his recent trip to China (December 5, 2013) that addresses some of these issues. Of particular importance is SIPO’s public recognition as a result of the Vice President’s visit that its Examination Guidelines are governed by Article 84 of the Law on Legislation, which limits their retroactive effect. This can have important consequences beyond Article 26.3, and should require limit SIPO’s discretion in applying different versions of the Examination Guidelines to previously granted patents:

“China affirms that the Chinese Patent Examination Guidelines permit patent applicants to file additional data after filing their patent applications, and that the Guidelines are subject to Article 84 of the Law on Legislation, to ensure that pharmaceutical inventions receive patent protection. China affirms that this interpretation is currently in effect.”

See Joint Fact sheet: http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/latest-national/latest-national-news/48457-joint-fact-sheet-on-strengthening-u-s-china-economic-relations.html?tmpl=component).

Ministry of Commerce IP Program in DC December 5

Chen Fuli, IP Attaché at the Chinese Embassy in Washington, DC the morning of December 5.   The program is free of charge, but seating may be limited.   You should RSVP at: lishuai@mofcom.gov.cn.

The topics are all ones that I have actively followed in this blog.  Here is the tentative agenda:

International High Level IPR Cooperation Forum

Dec 5,  Georgetown Holiday Inn

2101 Wisconsin Ave, NW, 20007, Washington DC

 9:00-9:20  Opening remarks, by Both China and U.S. Representatives

 9:20-9:40   New developments in IP enforcement in China, by Director Jing Zhang from the Office of Fighting Against IPR Infringing and Making or Selling Counterfeit and Shoddy Products under the State Council

9:40-10:00  New amended Chinese Trademark Law, by Deputy Director General Qing Xia from CTMO

 10:00-10:15 Q & A

 10:15-10:30 Coffee Break

 10:30-10:50  Amending of Chinese Copyright Law by Deputy Director Ping Hu from NCAC

10:50-11:10  Amending of Chinese Patent Law and Regulation on Service Invention by director Yanhong Wang from SIPO

11:10-11:30  New practice of IP trials after the amendment of Chinese Civil Procedure Law by Judge Yuanming Qin from SPC

11:30-11:50 Q & A

11:50-12:00 Closing Remarks

—————-

12:00-13:30                    Lunch (hosted by China for all the participants)

In addition to the speakers noted above, there will also be Chinese official participants from public security, Customs, procuratorate, AQSIQ and other agencies, which should help make for lively discussion and interaction.  I hope to see you there!

Second Public NCA Draft of Copyright Law Available For Public Comment

The National Copyright Administration (NCA) has released its second draft revision of the copyright law for public comment.   The draft is found here.  http://www.ncac.gov.cn/cms/html/309/3502/201207/759779.html, including an accompanying explanation  http://www.ncac.gov.cn/cms/cms/upload/info/201207/759779/134155627509826706.doc.   Comments are due July 31.   The draft was released July 6.  Several trade associations in the US have already expressed an interest in commenting again. Continue reading

Who Is Commenting on the Copyright Law Revisions?

The National Copyright Administration released its draft of revisions to the Copyright Law on March 31, 2012, with comments due by April 30, 2012. Thus far, approximately two thousand comments have been received. The draft is not yet calendared for formal consideration by the State Council Legislative Affairs Office (SCLAO) for this year, or by the National People’s Congress. In addition, further consideration may be delayed because there are other IP laws, such as the Trademark Law and Anti-unfair Competition Law that are still pending with the SCLAO. However, Vice Commissioner Yan Xiaohong of NCA noted at the recent Federal Circuit Bar Association conference in Beijing that he expected submission to the State Council by the end of the year.

Continue reading

Understanding China’s New Environment for Intellectual Property

On April 11th, Fordham Law School held its first China focused IP Conference, “Understanding China’s New Environment for Intellectual Property”.  The program covered a range of issues, from patenting trends, to challenges in design protection, and intellectual property protection challenges for cloud computing in China, with mixed panels of academics, practitioners, judges and government officials from both countries. Continue reading

“Case Filing” In China’s Courts and Their Impact on IP Cases

In my experience over the past decade and in talking to local IP courts in China, the IPR judges have for the most part been very forthcoming, knowledgeable and engaging.  However, their colleagues in the Case Filing Division (立案庭) (“CFD”) have operated in a much more opaque way, typically not willing to meet at all, despite their playing a critical role in certain WTO / TRIPS obligations of China, such as granting/denying preliminary injunctions, and preliminary evidence or asset preservation measures (“provisional measures”) (TRIPS Art. 50).  The CFD of a court is more than a court clerk or docketing officer, the CFD actually operates to accept or deny cases, typically without handing down written decisions of any kind.

The opaque nature of the CFD was highlighted more generally in some recent postings on China Law Net, hosted by Prof. Don Clarke.  Dr. Liu Nanping and Michelle Liu recently authored an article on the significance of the CFD.[1]  The article argues, generally without the benefit of the much smaller quantity of data from IPR-related cases, that a right to justice can often be taken away by the CFD before ever reaching the courtroom for trial. In theory, the CFD was designed to filter disputes for resolution through other channels, thereby limiting the judges’ power and controlling court jurisdiction.  In practice, however, it has been found that the division often abuses its discretion, including by pushing off controversial cases.  The authors point out that the CFD rejects cases that should have passed the initial threshold and leaves litigants with reduced channels to pursue justice.

Case filing became especially important after China joined the WTO, as decisions on provisional IP civil measures are initially sent to this division.   As China does not yet afford these provisional measures in other civil cases, the experience of the CFD in handling these matters was likely limited or non-existent before WTO accession.  Regrettably, the statistics to date show only a limited number of these measures actually being made available to rights holders, and call into question whether use of the CFD is the optimal means for China to fully make this right available to litigants.

China’s statistics in this area are confusing:  they show a high “grant” rate of accepted cases involving provisional measures – but they don’t reveal how many cases were rejected by the CFD, since such cases were deemed to have never been “filed”.  This “pre-screening”, I believe, contributes to the high grant rate. A more revealing data point is made by comparing the numbers of such provisional measure cases with the total number of IP cases filed.  The incidence of such cases is very low, most likely because the cases never appear on the docket.   If one were to look at the grant rates alone, one might think that China had particularly robust preliminary injunctions in all IP rights.  In 2009, 85.42% of pre-trial preliminary injunction applications admitted in IP cases were granted.  The number is especially striking because in US practice, preliminary injunctions for patents are rarely granted.  China also showed even higher grant rates for other provisional measures: 98.72% of admitted applications for pre-trial preservation of evidence were granted and 100% of admitted applications for pre-trial preservation of property were granted. In 2010, the grant rates for these provisional measures were 89.74% for preliminary injunction applications, 97.46% of preservation of evidence applications, and 97.41% for preservation of property applications.

A more revealing data point is made by comparing the numbers of such provisional measure cases with the total number of IP cases filed.  In 2009, there were 59 pre-trial preliminary injunction applications, 237 pre-trial preservation of evidence applications, and 56 pre-trial asset preservation applications admitted amongst a total of 30,626 IP-related civil cases admitted at first instance. In 2010, 55 pre-trial preliminary injunction applications, 294 pre-trial preservation of evidence applications, 126 pre-trial asset preservation applications were admitted amongst a total of 42,931 IP-related civil cases admitted at first instance. The high grant rate undercuts the reliability of the overall data: if preliminary injunctions, evidence and asset preservation measures were so readily available, why then did only 0.12% of the civil IPR cases “request” preliminary injunctions, 0.68% of the cases involve evidence preservation, and 0.29% of the cases request asset preservation?

If one compares China to the United States, the rate of grants is likely higher than that of the U.S. for similar types of motions, but the actual number of cases considered by judges is dramatically lower. Moreover, if US experience is a guide, one would expect different grant rates for different types of provisional measures, depending in part on the right being asserted and the context of the case.  Preliminary injunctions in patents are likely to be rare, because of the technical difficulties in adjudicating patent cases and the hardship that might be imposed on an industry if the preliminary injunction was improperly granted.  For example, in the US, traditionally the likelihood of winning of a plaintiff winning in a patent case were 51.45%, versus 85% in trademarks and 75% in copyright.  Patent cases are also generally more complex to adjudicate, making them less amenable to preliminary injunctive relief.  According to one database, patent cases last 417 days on average, compared to 265 for trademark and 331 for copyright.  Because of the significant potential impact on an industry if a patent injunction were granted, injunction rates for final judgments were 30% for patents, versus 48% for trademarks and 21% for copyright (this data was based of FY 2000 data, from a now-defunct database run by Cornell University).  The mean award for patents is $1,759,345, while that of trademark cases is $484,428 and copyright was $837,525.

This U.S. data shows that patents, copyright, and trademark cases are not equal in damages, the length of time to adjudicate or availability of injunctive relief. In China, based on data from http://www.Ciela.cn, in 2008, the average damage award for patent, copyright, and trademark cases were 402,277 RMB, 17,912 RMB, and 88,444 RMB respectively; the duration for the respective types of cases were 8 months, 5 months and 6 months; injunction rates were 74%, 69%, and 85%.  Taken together, these indicate that there are major differences in damages and relief based on right and type of right at stake, which is to be predicted based on the nature of the right and the experience of other countries such as the United States.

It is likely that all types of provisional evidence and asset preservation measures for trademarks and copyrights should be higher, particularly as a remedy to dealing with commercial scale or willful infringement in China, and also because of the difficulties parties have in otherwise obtaining evidence from their adversary due to an absence of discovery-type procedures.  Unfortunately, China often comingles provisional measure data for all rights, making it impossible to determine if China is more readily granting those forms of relief in cases where it is more necessary, or more easily adjudicated.   This lack of distinction adds to the difficulties of evaluating the opaque CFD.

Preliminary evidence preservation measures can be especially critical when evidence is ephemeral, such as in the on-line environment.  Considering the rapid increase of civil copyright cases, the high incidence of on-line copyright cases in China today, as well as the lack of discovery type procedures for all civil cases in China, one would expect a very high incidence of preliminary evidence preservation measure requests and grants.

Apart from the opacity of the case establish division, there are potentially other explanations. Victims wanting a quick remedy, including preservation of evidence, may file administrative trademark or copyright cases.  Administrative agencies can also issue orders stopping infringement, which are enforceable in their administrative district.  These administrative remedies may decrease the burden on the civil courts to seize assets.  In the United States, first amendment rights may also limit the desire of courts to grant injunctions, and instead favor higher damage awards.  Another explanation is that the unclear division in China between when civil and criminal remedies may also drive rights holders to use criminal remedies in appropriate circumstances, as the police can seize evidence even more effectively than the courts. This has been the developing trend in trade secret cases, where lack of discovery proceedings and the need for expeditious action, frequently drive rights holders to use a criminal remedy when a civil remedy might have been adequate for similar actions in the United States.

Another observation that may be drawn from this data is that IPR cases offer a useful window with which to view other general rule of law developments in China.  The transparency and enforcement obligations in TRIPS and other agreements can especially help to drive reform in other areas as well.  Where civil IPR remedies and the enforcement obligations in TRIPS help to establish international standards for their fair and equitable adjudication, such standards might help lift to the standard for all litigants.

Updated: June 29, 2018 with minor typographical changes.


[1] Nanping Liu & Michelle Liu, Justice Without Judges: The Case Filing Division in the People’s Republic of China, 17 U.C. Davis J. Int’l L. & Pol’y 283 (2011)